Story of England

The Kibworth Harcourt Windmill, situated on the Langton Road, is an early 18th century postmill. It is a Grade 2* listed building and is also a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The mill is the last survivor of 211 postmills that were once used in Leicestershire.

The main feature of a post mill is that the whole body of the mill which houses the machinery is mounted on a single vertical post, around which it can be turned to bring the sails into the wind.

KHWindmill Post
The post (trestle) that the mill turns on

The central trestle is from an earlier mill on another site and is dated from the 14th century.

KHWindmill floor1
View of first floor showing the tressle

There are a number of carvings inside the mill, the earliest is on the tressle.

KHWindmill carving1
Carvings on the trestle, "DANIEL HUTCHINSON MILLER 1711”


KHWindmill carving2

Another carving, 'T SMITH MILLER OCTOR 1837”

The mill had two cloth (common) sails) and two spring sails (a spring sail has a number of shutters controlled by a bar and a spring which adjusts to the force of the wind). The miller turned the mill into the wind by hand using the rotation beam.

KHWindmill beam
Rotation beam used by the miller to turn the mill

The mill has two pairs of millstones, one of French Burr, the other of Derbyshire Peak Stone. One was used for animal feed and the other for flour. The top stone of the pair is called the runner stone, the lower stone is called the bed stone.

KHWindmill millstones
Flour Stones, the finer stones are for flour grinding

The stones are turned by a large wheel which runs the stone nut (a small gear). Once through the grinding process the ground grain passes through a flour dresser which separated the flour from the other pieces of the grain. A 19th century addition to the mill was iron governors which regulate the coarseness of the flour.

It was a working mill until 1912 but from then its condition began to decline. By the 1930s the mill was in very poor condition and the owners, Merton College, had the mill inspected by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB).  The inspection concluded that repairs would cost £100.00.

In 1936 Merton College transferred ownership of the mill to the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) who carried remedial work on the mill in 1936 and again in 1970.

On 8th August 2017 during an inspection of the mill one of the sails collapsed and fell to the ground. This caused the opposite sail to swing violently and it was badly damaged when it hit the ground.

KHWindmill part sails

For safety reasons the remaining sails were removed.

KHWindmill no sails
Postmill with sails removed

The Future

The Mills Section of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) has decided that a major overhaul of the mill is required and when completed will return the mill to a working condition. The overhaul will involve repair of the trestle and work to the roundhouse. Four new sails will be made, two common and two spring and a new tailpole and ladder. It is anticipated that the work will commence 2020.

 

Published in Early Modern

JOHNSON & BARNES LTD

Dover Street, Kibworth Beauchamp

The company was started by John Thomas Johnson who was working for a hosiery manufacturer in Fleckney when he decided to start his own business.  He installed two knitting frames in a shed in Kibworth Beauchamp and started production.  He was joined by William Barnes in 1901 and the Johnson and Barnes Company was created.

JohnsonBarnes

A factory was built in Dover Street and equipped with knitting machines to manufacture fully fashioned hose. The company expanded rapidly and in 1906 a factory was opened at Lutterworth and two years later new machines were purchased for the Kibworth factory. These new machines proved highly successful and the original building in Dover Street was extended.

JBfactory

Johnson and Barnes factory, Dover Street, Kibworth Beauchamp

The company purchased premises in Rutland Street Leicester which provided offices, showrooms, and warehousing space.

About this time Johnson and Barnes introduced the trade name ‘Excello’ for their hosiery products and the company became one of the leading manufacturers in the hosiery business.  Growth continued and in 1912 the business became a limited company.

The World War l years saw changes to the company, in 1915 a former lace-making factory in Stapleford, Nottinghamshire was acquired, John Thomas Johnson died in October 1917 and in 1918 the factory at Lutterworth was closed.

Post war the company thrived as demand for longer stockings increased with the company reacting to this fashion change by installing new machines

capable of producing longer and wider stockings which were marketed under the trade name ‘Flexcello’

New factory, warehouse and office space was acquired in Charles Street and Rutland Street Leicester and the head office was moved from Kibworth to the new premises.

William Barnes died in December 1932.

During World War ll the factories produced half-hose for the ATS, WAAF, and WRNS.

After the war the company continued to prosper and on 23rd February 1948 a factory was opened in Worsbrough, near Barnsley. Kibworth’s production was centred on fully fashioned ladies stockings and boys' three-quarter hose with production increasing to 3,500 dozen pairs a week.

In 1951 Johnson and Barnes celebrated their Golden Jubilee.

However, this was the beginning of the end of Johnson and Barnes as the hosiery trade was threatened by cheap overseas imports. This was followed in the early 1960s by the introduction of the mini-skirt and the demand for tights instead of stockings. Johnson & Barnes had insufficient capital to invest in new machinery required to produce tights. The company suffered during this time and in 1961 the Worsborough factory was closed. The business diversified into the production of knitted garments and the company was acquired by a Canadian financier, Joel David Lerner. In 1970 the Leicester premises were sold, the Stapleford factory was rebuilt and the Kibworth factory was closed in 1971. By 1977 the business had been bought by an investment company, however it continued to lose money and in May 1981 a Receiver was appointed. The Stapleford factory closed that year. Liquidators were appointed in August 1983 with Johnson & Barnes Ltd dissolved in January 1987. 

Acknowledgements:

George Weston
Kibworth History Society
Kibworth and District Chronicle

Published in Modern

Leicestershire’s first turnpike road was a section of the main road between London and West Scotland which is now the A6.  The road was built in 1726 and ran through Loughborough, Leicester, Kibworth Harcourt and Market Harborough.

The Turnpike Acts authorised Trusts to levy tolls on those using the road and to use that income to repair and improve the road. Trusts could also purchase property to widen or divert existing roads. The trusts were not-for-profit and maximum tolls were set. In 1726 the first Turnpike Trusts, in Leicestershire were the Market Harborough to Leicester and the Loughborough to Leicester Trusts

The Kibworth Harcourt section ran along the current A6 Leicester Road from Leicester turning left into Main Street then following the dogleg of Main Street back onto the Leicester Road at the Rose and Crown Coaching Inn. At first the turnpike road was surfaced with gravel and small stones, but towards the end of the 18th century granite chippings from Mountsorrel began to be used.

In 1766, a fast public stagecoach service commenced from Leicester to London. Coaching Inns were built along the road examples being the Rose and Crown Inn and the Coach and Horses Inn in Kibworth Harcourt.

Travelers were often fearful of being robbed by highwaymen and the Leicester Journal for  12 December 1775 reported that: ‘On Sunday night last the coach bound for London was stopped by a single highwayman near to the second milestone on the Harboro’ Road. He took from the passengers about £14; told them that necessity obliged him to do that or go to goal’.

The first mail coaches passed through Kibworth Harcourt in 1785 and were apparently quite a spectacle. The carriages had emblazoned arms, the coachmen and guards in scarlet and gold. A blunderbuss slung over the guards’ shoulders, with pistols in their belts. 

Royal Mail coachMail Coach 1790s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examples of  Royal Mail Coaches

 

A report by the Turnpike Trust on the route along the dogleg section of Main Street concluded that; ‘The man who could gallop a four in hand through such lanes must have been hard to find’. This report followed a number of accidents and at least one resulted in a fatality, when a coach overturned and several outside passengers were pitched through the windows of nearby houses. The report resulted in a new turnpike route bypassing Main Street which followed the line of the current A6 Leicester Road between the Main Street junctions. This bypass was opened in 1810 and built at a cost of £1,500.00. Such improvements were funded by the payment of tolls by the road users, Examples of the annual income from tolls for the Market Harborough to Loughborough Trusts are:  1834 £5592:   1835 £6798:   1838 £5911.

In 1822 the whole road was surfaced in tarmac. The volume of traffic began to increase until the railway between Leicester and London opened in 1875 when turnpike traffic dwindled and the Turnpike Trust was wound up in 1878.

 

Writteb by David Adams

 

Acknowledgements.

www.parliment.uk

 semper-eadem.tripod.com

The Leicester Journal

http://www.turnpikes.org.uk/English%20turnpike%20table.htm

 

Published in Early Modern

Who Were The Beaker People?

The Bell-Beaker culture,  sometimes shortened to Beaker culture, Beaker people, or Beaker folk, c. 2900 – 1800 BC is the term for a widely scattered  archaeological culture' of prehistoric western Europe starting in the late Neolithic or Chalcolithic and running into the early Bronze Age.  They were called Beaker because of the shape of their pottery vessels.Beaker

The Beaker People were farmers and archers were also the first metalsmiths in Britain, working first in copper and gold, and later in bronze, given its name to the Bronze Age.

The Burial Ground.

A burial ground of Beaker People was found in 1975 situated to the south west of Smeeton Westerby  on Smeeton Hill  The hill is 500 feet high and on the west side of the hill lies the Beaker Burial Ground.  No trace of a burial mound is visible on the ground but the situation would be ideal for one.

The site was discovered during drainage excavations work when at one point the contractor had to excavate a hole by hand to replace a broken section of pipe. It was during this work that the burial site was discovered and human bones and pottery were unearthed.  The drainage work carried on and the burial site continued to be disturbed and some artefacts were removed although the majority were subsequently recovered.

 Leicestershire Museums were notified and on 3rd September 1975 a team from the museum attended the site.  They enlarged the hole and discovered a crouched burial. A crouched burial was a new form of burial rite, called the Beaker burial which began to appear around 4700 years ago, the burial is crouched inhumation where the body is interred, usually on its side with the hip and knee joints bent through an angle of more than 90 degrees, accompanied by a particular pottery known as a beaker.  The burial was removed to Leicester Museum;

Beaker Close in Smeeton Westerby is a reminder of this important archaeological find.

Written by David Adams

 

Acknowledgements

R A Rutland, ‘A Beaker Burial at Smeeton Westerby, Leicestershire 1875’

Spoilheap Archaeology

Wikipedia

Published in Ancient

This brief note is about Smeeton Westerby resident Captain Thomas Smithies Taylor (born 5 July 1863), who founded a company that was to dominate lens manufacturing in the inter-war period. Through his camera lenses, the world quite literally saw the twentieth century.

Published in Contemporary
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